My Free Patterns

I am still sorting out the blog entries for my free patterns, so there willl still be patterns that are not accessible. My apologies.

Sunday, 29 September 2013

It may not be a whodunit ..

.... but I was almost done in by this Mystery.

So happy with what I see after rounds 1 and 2, I started on Round 3.  And, would you know it, the ruffling start to appear, again.  That really put me off for a while.

Add to that, I closed the round one repeat short, and had to un-tat and re-tat the end.  Luckily, this time I use the 6-ply Lizbeth thread.  I think I would have cut it off if it had been the Cebelia that I used the first time.

Then, while trimming off the thread ends where I added new thread, I wrongly snipped of the one of the thread that should be hidden.  Ughhhh ... must remember to do something about that later, like dabbing a dot of glue over the knot.

This is how it looks after Round 3.  The colours did not turn out properly, it was taken in poor lighting.

But, the day was eventful.  I had my five minutes of fame appearing on national television talking about tatting.  It was a segment in a lifestyle tv program and I was giving an introduction to tatting, without going into details of the techniques.

It was not live tv, but a recording made a few weeks earlier but was only aired today.  Please excuse the poor quality of the video, it was recorded off the tv.



The beautiful ribbon embroidery and tatted edgings that you see is the work of my lovely friend Umi Kalsom Ismail.  She has a page in Facebook where you can view many of her other work at Umi's Embroidered Gifts.

15 comments:

  1. Ten out of ten for persistence, the results are wonderful! Congratulations on your TV appearance, good publicity for the craft of tatting.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your mystery doily looks very good, it is coming along nicely. Congratulations on your tv appearance. It is really wonderful that your talent is being noticed, and that you were able to introduce tatting to others.
    Thank you Jon.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow! Great video and introduction to the art of tatting! I could follow what you were saying by the way you demonstrated different aspects, so I am sure it was very clear to those who heard it in your language. Impressive indeed. I need your autograph now. Congrats!
    Fox : )

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mine is frilling too on the third round Jon! But how lovely to see you talking about tatting on television! And I see the mystery doily even features in there...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great video. I loved seeing you in action. It's hard to know what someone is like by just reading a blog. I recognized your mystery doily and your books in the video. Thank you for promoting tatting!

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's a great video! Congratulations, Jon!

    I think your Mystery Doily is looking wonderful, too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Jon, that was wonderful to see! Thank you so much for saving a copy from the TV.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love your colour way with this mat, I have nit started trying this mat as I seem to have a lot on at the moment.
    Well done with your five mins of fame, the video did not appear but I am sure you were brilliant.
    Margaret

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, you may need to jnstall a flash player on your computer. I can't view it on my tablet because I don't have that installed but it comes up fine on my laptop.

      Delete
  9. Thank you everyone. I hope I was able to get some people interested.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Your doily is so very beautiful!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. How exciting! It was fun to hear your voice, even though I don't speak your language.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Congratulations, Mrs Yusof. You are really teaching the world to tat! Wonderfull.
    Your mystery doily looks gorgeous. Why does it bother you that it frills? Isn't blocking supposed to solve that problem? Or does it frill a lot?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is a good point, Tally Tatty.

      However, I always feel that with proper tension and stitch count, a piece of tatting should be able to form its intended shape on its own, without being pulled into shape during blocking.

      That is what I always aim for in my designs. The exception is when the designs contain a lot of long chains and blocking becomes necessary.

      Delete
    2. Aha, you are a perfectionist! I like that. But,.. every piece of needlework has it own identity, tension and beauty when it is finished. The whole is more that the sum of the parts. I feel that this is especially true with knitting. You can have mistakes, and it may look ugly, but once finished , washed and dried, these mistakes suddely dissapear. I read somewhere in a Mary Konior book that she calls is 'gestalt'. Well, that is what I mean..

      Delete

Thank you leaving comments. I really appreciate it